Mahim Pandhi Wildlife Foundation
DesertCrocs Research and Conservation Project

The Mahim Pandhi Wildlife Foundation's DesertCrocs project aims to track the behavior and distribution of crocodile populations, and observe how they navigate the challenges presented by the arid environment of the isolated region of Kutch, India. We believe these crocodiles may have something unique to show us.

256
Population Discovered
400+
Estimated Total
28
Sites Discovered
60+
Estimated Total
6,558,700m2
Area Surveyed
256
Population Discovered
400+
Estimated Total
28
Sites Discovered
60+
Estimated Total
6,558,700m2
Area Surveyed

Crocodiles in the Desert

Crocodylus Palustris, commonly known as the Marsh Crocodile or simply Mugger, is a one of the least studied crocodilian species at the best of times. Most studies in this area seem to be focused on crocodile-human conflicts. We aim to take on a different perspective, and discover potentially unknown aspects of these crocodiles.

We believe the unique environment and distribution of water bodies here is unlike any other place where Muggers are found, and may inspire behavioral and even morphological changes in the Mugger.

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Documentary

Dragons in the Desert

Journey through the harsh lands of Kutch as we explore small oases where crocodiles carve out their territory. Separated by vast empty lands, these crocodiles are very adept at moving between water holes, and even surviving months on end without water or food.

Experience the hidden life of crocodiles through a different point of view, and see the challenges they face in the desert.

Watch the trailer →

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Environmental Cleanup

Human encroachment onto wild lands has reached a dangerous level. Plastic waste now litters almost every single oasis inhabited by crocodiles and other animals.

We have begun a series of cleanup initiatives as well as education programs with the assistance of local volunteers and organizations.

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Decoding a 45 million year old fossil

We have recently been asked to help preserve and research fossilized remains of a Crocodyliform from the early Eocene, found near the Great Rann of Kutch.

This specimen is estimated to have been 8-10 meters, almost as large as a Sarcosuchus Imperator, with head extending to almost 2 meters.

It's species is yet to be identified.

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